On Gun Violence in America

Thank you Amnesty International for sponsoring this post.

Between the four walls of a classroom, the sanctuary of a church, a concert, a movie theater, an airport, a post office, a gaming event, a home, a military base, a neighborhood, a grandmother’s porch.

And,

and,

and,

and.

Phones go unanswered. Children don’t return home from school. Families unimaginably, irreparably scattered and broken.

beautiful-minimal-seagulls

Gun violence is a public health crisis and its disease is distinctly American.

Gun_Violence_U.S._Facts

Every day, over 100 people in America die due to gun violence. In 2016, 38,658 people were killed as a result of gun violence, and over 116,000 people were injured.

protest_sign_weeping_Statue_of_Liberty

According to Amnesty International’s recently released comprehensive report, American gun violence is a human rights crisis – and the U.S. government must be held accountable. The report details how high rates of gun ownership, and ease of access to firearms by individuals likely to misuse them compromises all aspects of life in America – and the U.S. governments refusal to pass sensible gun control laws is a violation of human rights.  No one’s human right to life can be considered secure in a nation where our government’s response to gun violence is inaction.

It isn’t OK that as parents, so many of us instinctively search for the closest emergency exit when taking our kids to the movie theaters. I dream of a future that is free of lock down drills, bulletproof backpacks, clear backpacks, specialized attack-resistant doors and stoppers, and words of “thoughts and prayers” wrapped in inaction.

Dumbo-Brooklyn-NYC

Like Amnesty International, I believe that gun violence is a human rights issue. We need sensible gun laws and policies. It isn’t normal for kids to fear being killed in their homes, schools, streets, and playgrounds in their neighborhoods. Yet all of this has become part of our daily lives in America.

Collective outrage fuels conviction and resolve. Communities across this country are coming together to solve gun violence. We have the knowledge and conviction to get this done. And the gun-violence-prevention movement is winning like never before.

How Can I Help?

  • Get to the polls this November and encourage your friends and family to elect candidates committed to ending gun violence.
  • Learn more about gun violence as a human rights crisis and stay informed by reading Amnesty International’s latest report on gun violence. Amnesty is campaigning on bills in states across the country. One bill is to end illegal gun trafficking in Illinois. This bill would require common sense measures to help stop the sale of dangerous, illegal guns in the state. It would make communities safer by requiring video surveillance outside dealerships, and it would make our kids safer by prohibiting new gun dealerships from opening within 500 meters of a school.
  • Help to stop the spread of illegal guns and take action to support the work of Amnesty by signing the petition here.

 

I was selected for this opportunity as a member of CLEVER and the content and opinions expressed here are all my own.

Share

Meet Carlos, The 5-year-old Boy Behind Bars For Nearly 700 Days

I’ve partnered with Amnesty International to create a video series about the children and their parents fleeing horrific violence, conflict, and persecution in their home countries only to be thrown into detention here in the United States. They have come here asking for asylum, a form of protection recognized under U.S. and international law. Please join in urging our government to stop locking up families merely seeking safety.  Please join in demanding an end to family detention. 

Carlos-Free-the-Berks-kids-Amnesty-International

Carlos, 5, greets me with a warm and curious smile. Peeking up at me, from behind his mother Lorena’s legs, he clutches a book given to him a day prior by Kristin from Amnesty International’s team. As I ease my way into earning this sweet little boy’s trust, he shows me how he’s already memorized his new book, naming all the animals in both English and Spanish.

Monica-and-Carlos-end-family-detention

I soon learn that Carlos can’t wait to go to Kindergarten, dreams of riding a bike, enjoys coloring, and loves to spend time playing outside. I sing a song that my mother used to sing to me as a child. Carlos joins me; he knows the lyrics. This song from my mother’s childhood is one of the many commonalities we uncover – yet the stark difference in our trajectories from South and Central America is never lost on me.

Carlos-end-family-detention-Amnesty-International

Although Carlos reminds me of my own children at age five, his story is far from typical. At an age where most kids enjoy unstructured play as they come into their own, Carlos spent his time behind bars. Alongside his mother Lorena, this loving little boy spent nearly 700 (yes, seven hundred) of his early childhood days detained inside what is known as the oldest “baby jail” in America, the Berks County Residential Center in Berks County, Pennsylvania.

Carlos learned to talk behind bars.

sunset-swings-playground

As Lorena unravels personal accounts of their story it shakes me to my core. The trauma inflicted by our government, and along every step of their escape from violence is beyond unfathomable.

Despite all that Lorena has endured, she is incredibly resilient and affectionate. She is the sort of person who carries (and spreads) such palpable joy. Spending time with Lorena is indeed a gift, and her openness in revisiting her layers of trauma (which often triggers debilitating migraines) is entirely rooted in helping others still behind bars.

Lorena and Carlos fled gang violence, extortion and kidnapping threats at gunpoint in their home country – a place where Amnesty International has documented horrific violence. This mother left everything she knew, with her 2-year-old son in her arms to make the arduous and dangerous journey to the United States in hopes of a simple human right: safety. Lorena and her son could have lost their lives, like so many others, had she stayed paralyzed in fear and not fled.

Carlos-Amnesty-International

As a mother, I cannot even begin to imagine being in this impossible predicament. But I sure as hell know that I too would flee with my family wrapped in my arms if conflict threatened the lives of my children. I would leave everything I knew, and trade every dollar, for the hope of a path to safety, and security.

Monica-and-Carlos-Amnesty-International

Lorena and Carlos were apprehended crossing the border to Texas. Lorena was holding her young toddler in her arms as they were pulled out of the water. The details which weave their testimony together are gut-wrenching, cruel and unjust – along with the experience of their time in Berks, behind bars.

The Berks is not a hotel stay or a home. It is a jail with guards and cameras. Berks is a place where families, babies, children, and teens are woken up for bed-checks at all hours of the night. It is a place where kids can’t consume home-cooked meals. It is a place where children and parents are forced to eat unfamiliar processed, cold foods. Berks is the place where a guard was convicted of sexually assaulting a teenager detained there.

Mothers and fathers are facing an impossible choice – flee violence and persecution in their home countries – or stay and risk their children’s lives. If you aren’t outraged, sickened and profoundly saddened by the brutal reports of the U.S. government forcibly separating children from their parents, then you are not paying attention. Sadly, this is hardly over. Thousands of children and babies forcibly separated from their parents at the border must be reunified. President Trump’s recent Executive Order is not a plan to stop violating the rights of people feeling unimaginable violence. This Executive Order imprisons families indefinitely, inflicting further harm on children and their parents.

Detaining families seeking asylum together is not a solution.

We must be morally obligated to demand this stop.

HOW TO TAKE ACTION:

Carlos and Lorena are now free, thanks to Amnesty and its dedicated supporters – but so many others are in dire need of help.

Amnesty International is tirelessly working to stop the inhumane practice of jailing families seeking asylum. Please join in taking action today:

CALL YOUR ELECTED OFFICIALS: Call upon your representatives to end the inhumane practice of jailing families seeking asylum. The number for the congressional switchboard is 1-844-879-0282.

SIGN THE PETITION: I always thought that signing petitions felt like the most inactive form of activism – but my time spent with the Amnesty team taught me that signatures on their petitions absolutely make a difference. If you do one thing today, please sign the petitions here and here.

USE YOUR VOICE: Talk to your family, friends, neighbors, and social media communities about how the Executive Order only inflicts further harm. Talk about the families behind bars on U.S. soil at places like Berks, and spread the word that we’re fighting for the end of family detention, and for the recent ruling baring family separation and ordering reunification to be implemented.

I will be sharing further. Thank you so much for reading.

Carlos and Lorena are not their real names. *

Thank you, Amnesty International USA for sponsoring this post.

Share